Ringing in the Reedbeds

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An exquisite male Bearded Tit

On Sunday we started ringing in the reedbeds at  Farlington Marshes nature reserve. The aim is to concentrate on the bearded tits to try and get an idea as to how the population is faring. It turned out to be a reasonable start and we caught a good number of birds. The females all had brood patches which signifies breeding so things are looking good.

Bearded tits, actually called bearded parrotbills now (formally bearded reedlings) are one of Farlington’s iconic species. They draw in a lot of people as the site has a very good population, especially for its size. The only issue is that they are very difficult to see. Normally all you get is a fleeting view of them as they bounce over the top of the reed before quickly dropping down. This makes monitoring very difficult and really the only way that we have a chance of getting a population estimate is through ringing. This also helps us look at longevity of individuals and location within the reed bed itself. All very useful stuff which can help influence how we manage the site.

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A very handsome male Reed Bunting

It was a good session catching bearded tits, reed bunting, Cetti’s warbler and sedge warbler. The whole reed bed was alive with the chatter of segdes and there were even some reed warbler there. These will build up steadily as they migrate in and then disperse leaving the breeding population.

The lapwing have begun to settle down and there seems to be a good number of redshank on the marsh and in the hay field. Hopefully we will see a higher than average year for these this year but its still early days. The lapwing are in low numbers but this is the same across many sites at the moment so hopefully they are just late arriving.

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The very noisy Sedge Warbler

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An old goose

429a3052We have been undertaking a large survey project this winter, looking at movements of Brent Geese and waders around the Solent. This will hopefully help towards guiding development in the future as we hope to highlight which areas are most important for the birds. This may be a large reserve like Farlington or a playing field such the Polo Field in Gosport or the college playing fields in Portsmouth.

What is key is to work out what fields are important and how they move around these, not only throughout the day as part of their natural cycle but also when they are flushed by some sort of disturbance event, such as a dog walker, jogger etc. Do they just move a small distance and return or do they move site completely, potentially highlighting a suit of sites in one area that are important if they are moved on by human activity.

With that in mind, we have been looking at a lot of geese! Several thousand throughout the Solent area but one in particular has been noticed a couple of times. This is G4 a colour ringed brent goose that was spotted on the 13th of Feburary in Portsmouth. This was ringed in 1999 in Farlington as a Juvenile. It was then recorded around the harbour, mainly off Portsea Island all winter. It then disappeared until September 2000 when it showed up at Farlington again. It followed the same pattern as the year before and then on 30th March it was recorded at Leyhoern Nature Reserve on the North Coast of Germany.

It was then recorded almost every year in the Netherlands in late April or early May and then it was then picked up in Portsmouth again in 2011 and 2012 during early winter and then Germany in 2014 and 2015 in early April.

This shows the clear staging areas that this goose was using along the coast of the Netherlands and the north coast of Saxony. It spent many of its winters (probably all of them) in the Langstone harbour area and then around April it popped over the sea and spent a month or so in Netherlands and Germany before carrying on up north.

The early data is much more complete, with more recorders around then. This allowed a good idea of what was happening around the harbour for this goose and this is reflective of at least its family group if not a wider sub population as the geese are creatures of habit and tend to do the same thing each day, each year.

We have started to see patterns through the survey work that we have undertaken this year. For instance the Gosport geese follow a circuit around the amenity pitches throughout the day before flying out to Portsmouth harbour to roost. The geese off of the west side of Hayling move out to the RSPB islands at high tide before moving onto Farlington and then on to the playing field behind and then reverse to roost in the lakes on the reserve or on the islands.429a2881

It’s really important that we know what these birds are doing and the colour ringing scheme has provided some excellent data. Not only do we know that that goose is 18 years old (oldest record is 28) but we know roughly where it goes whilst its in our area and then where its staging grounds are on the way back north. There are a number of different colour ringing schemes across the area on a wide species of birds such as Black Tailed Godwits. The bird pictured above was recorded moving around the Solent area one year,showing a range of sites used. It was then recorded in late Spring in Iceland. The next winter it was back in the Solent area before heading to the west country. Really interesting stuff.