Summer is here

I’ve not posted in a little while. A mixture of being very busy, very relaxed (on holiday) and more recently very hot. Working in thirty degree heat over the last couple of days has been somewhat taxing.

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It is starting to happen though. Invertebrate life is springing into action all over our reserves and as things quieten down with the bird life, we stop looking up and start staring intently into the long grass.  That isn’t to say that there aren’t any decent birds around.

Farlington Marshes nature reserves has had the usual, a mob of black-tailed godwits chattering away by the building or on the deeps. They were joined the other week by a stunning male ruff, in full breeding plumage. this chap has been frequenting various sites around the Solent for a few weeks now. There have also been a lot of bearded tits showing off in the reed bed.

The meadow browns have emerged en mass across most of our sites. Swanwick and Hookheath in particular. We have also seen silver washed fritillaries, white admirals and marbled whites, with at least one purple emperor reported as well.

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Swanwick Lakes nature reserve has also had its fair share of dragons. A walk through on Friday afternoon saw Emperor, black-tailed skimmer, red-eyed damselfly, golden-ringed, common blue, blue-tailed and small red damselfly. There have also been downy emeralds seen regularly, but not by me, despite a lot of trying.

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The orchids this year have been exceptional. North-east meadow at Swanwick Lakes nature reserve has had the most ever, as has Hookheath. Farlington has had a very good year, with common spotted and southern marsh orchids filling the top of the hay field and pyramidal orchids scattered along the path.

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All in all its been a good, yet warm, couple of weeks – and over the next couple, we should see a bigger emergence of species like marbled whites, gatekeepers and a few more silver washed.

Sightings for week ending 14/05/2017

It’s been a pretty mixed week, with the start nice and sunny and the end, some well-deserved rain and we still have migrants coming in! The swifts have started to turn up and there are generally more hirundines across all the sites. Swanwick Lakes had a big flock of house martins over it the other night whilst I was stomping around doing and evening survey.

The seals have been quite obvious recently. If you take a scope to the southern end of Farlington and look across the mud flats at low tide, there is almost always several, hauled out along the creek that runs near to the aggregates port. Whilst sitting having lunch at Southmoor yesterday, one popped its head up just off the shore. Always exciting seeing a seal. Love them!

For me, the stars of the show this week have been the grey plover on the main lake at Farlington. They are in their breeding plumage and are absolutely stunning. The little terns have also been making themselves known. At high tide they come really close to the sea wall, fishing right on the edge,. Perfect opportunity for some shots of terns disappearing into the water.

The usual around otherwise. A marsh harrier has been spotted a lot, the short eared owl is still around, surprisingly, and the yellow wagtails are regularly in among the cattle on the main marsh. In the bushes there are lesser whitethroat around.

There was a cuckoo calling at Swanwick on Monday, the only one across all my sites this year (that I have heard anyway). There has also been a garden warbler singing away and a firecrest. These are both good records for the site, with potentially breeding firecrest a new record.

We’ve had a couple of rough weeks for butterflies. We have struggled to get our survey work done as it’s actually been quite chilly during the days. Wednesday wasn’t too bad though with highlights at Swanwick and Hookheath being, green hairstreak, holly blue and small copper. There was also a hairy dragonfly and beautiful demoiselle recorded.

Sightings week ending – Easter!

gv whiteNice to have a long weekend, it means that I can actually get out birding and hopefully do a bit of ringing!

It’s been another glorious week and you have to wonder when the run of good weather will break, though as I write this clouds are amassing over my house. Maybe a bit of bad weather would be good though, as the migrants seem to be flying straight through. A low cloud base for a few days and we might see a fall.

There have been some migrants around. A cracking male Wheatear has been along the south edge of the marsh at Farlington. There has also been a Redstart in the bushes, plenty of Whimbrel in the harbour and I saw my first Little Tern on Thursday. There are also Reed Warbler, Sedges and Blackcaps all over the site. The resident Cettis are very noisy and the Linnets are singing really well all the way around the point field. There was a Marsh Harrier on Thursday for half an hour or so.

There are still two Avocets on the deeps which is looking very promising but I don’t want to jinx it.

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Hook heath Meadows is currently glorious, full of Ramsoms, Bluebells, Wood Anemone, Red Campion and a number of other really nice woodland plants. There was also a Mandarin hanging around a suitable looking nesting hole. Not a native but an impressive looking fowl and I certainly have nothing against it if he fancies making a nest in an old willow. The butterflies are also building. I had a lovely Green Veined White on Tuesday.

Fingers crossed it’ll be a good Easter weekend for all the sites and hopefully everybody can get out and enjoy nature. Unfortunately there is a lot of antisocial behaviour going on at the moment. Some of our northern reserves have been hit really badly by arson. We’ve suffered down south but, thankfully, not quite as dramatically. Poaching, BBQ’s in areas where birds are nesting, people walking through the middle of the marsh and kids throwing rocks at birds are just a few things that will be taking their toll on our breeding birds. I am very sure that those of you who read this blog regularly are people who conscientiously enjoy nature but please feel free to report incidents to us as the more of the picture that we can build, the better we can deal with it.

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Sightings for week ending 09/04/2017`

What a glorious week it’s been! Well, apart from Monday which was highly dependant on where you were. I left the Botley offices in the morning in sunshine and tshirt weather and by the time I was at Farlington I was wrapped up against the mist and chill air.

A lot is starting to move now but the migrants are still holding back. The most significant influx has been the Sedge and Reed Warblers in the reed bed at Farlington. There is a good number chattering away and the Bearded Tits have been very active up the building end. There is a Cettis in the bush by the feeder which makes itself known occasionally.

I’m quite excited as there is a pair of Avocets hanging around. It has been a very good winter for Avocet on the reserve and to have a pair nest would be the cherry on the cake but its early days and they may just be hanging around until they feel strong enough to move to their breeding grounds. Fingers crossed.

There are around 80 Black-Tailed Godwits in glorious chestnut attire on the lake, well worth a look at in their breeding plumage. There is also a Marsh Harrier, two Short Eared Owls and the usual Widgeon,Teal, Shelduck, Redshank, Lapwing, Skylark, Meadow Pipits, Rock Pipits and Stonechats. There has been reports of an Osprey in the Isle of Wight today so that may head over soon.

Emma did a transect at Hookheath yeaterday and had a very good start. Green Veined White, Orange Tips,Speckled Wood, Peacocks, Brimstones and Commas are all on the wing as well as some Blues. The same at Swanwick.

All set to be a lovely weekend so worth a wander around the sea wall at Farlington I’d say.

 

Sightings for week ending 19/03/2017

Spoonbill! That was the most exciting sighting from the week. Last weekend and the early part of this week there was one on the scrape and the lake at Farlington. It eventually flew west and Wednesday there was one at Pennington so may be this one. Still, worth keeping an eye out for and hopefully there will be some more.

Plenty on the Marsh this week. Still the usual suspects with the Spotted Redshank returning and two Marsh Harriers and of course the SEO’s. There was also talk of a little ringed plover down the stream at the start of the week and I’ve had reports of Wheatears turning up. Two Ravens flew in on Tuesday and there are plenty of Chiffchaffs singing across all the sites. The reeds on the deeps are excellent spots for watching the stunning male Reed Buntings singing away at the moment.

Still lots of Brents, Pintail, Teal and Widgien on the main marsh and the stream as well as a number of wader species. Black Tailed Godwits and Dunlin are still present and plenty of Snipe, Redshank, Lapwing and Curlew across the whole site. The Redshank and Lapwing are starting to settle down to  nest and you can hear them calling in the morning across the lower section of the marsh.

Plenty of butterflies have been seen this week. Swanwick seems to be the hot spot for us. Brimstone, Peacock, Comma and Red Admiral have been seen on every visit that was sunny. There has also been Slow Worm, Common Lizard and Grass Snake reported.

Sightings for week ending 12/03/2017

Its been a busy week down Farlington this week. Lots of Bearded Tits, a Marsh Harrier, Kingfisher, Barn Owl, tons of Curlew, Brent Geese and Shelduck and still a Short Eared Owl or two. There was a leucistic duck by the building Tuesday which I think was a Gadwal, despite being positioned next to a Pintail.

Today was particularly gloomy but there were 500+ Dunlin feeding on the mudflats west of the marsh with a few Black Tailed Godwits and Redshank mixed in. There was also one solitary Avocet roosting on the lake. I haven’t seen any Avocet around for a little while, despite the high numbers earlier in the year.

Spring really descended on Thursday. We were working in tshirts at Swanwick Lakes, basking in the warmth on the edge of the lakes. Whilst we were sat at lunch we had a Brimstone, Peacock, Comma and a Red Admiral pass by! These are the first butterflies that I have seen this year.

I think Saturday will be the better day this weekend and so will be a good opportunity to see the last of the waders and wildfowl. The numbers have certainly dropped significantly in the last couple of weeks and it will be sensible to keep an eye out for the first of the summer migrants. Reports of Wheatears and House/Sand Martins have been arriving across the country for a week or so now!

Sightings for week ending 05/03/2017

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It’s been a mixed week weather wise and I think that this will carry on into the weekend with Saturday looking good but Sunday turning grim. So if you are getting out, Saturday would be the best bet.

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I have managed to spend a lot of time down at Farlington this week which has been lovely. Thursday was a fantastic day where we worked in the reedbed and I am glad to say that we were absolutely surrounded by Bearded Tits. I waded into the reed to look for a ditch and four were sat in a tall stand. They were pinging around us all day. Unfortunately this does not help you if you wish to see them as my best views have been whilst standing deep within the reed. I have seen them regularly near the feeder by the building and I have tried to keep it stocked with grit. I have also put millet in and the Reed Buntings are often present.They have started singing as well, I had a lovely view of a pair today.

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With some reasonable spring tides the marsh has been alive with birds. Well over a thousand Brent Geese were in the deeps on Tuesday and today they moved onto the top of the north marsh. Wigeon, Lapwing, Teal, Shelduck and Pintail are still in high numbers and today there were a good number of Grey Plover and Dunlin on the deeps.

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I sat at the lake after checking the sluice today and I was graced with a fly past from the Short Eared Owl and then the Peregrine  put everything up. Later in the afternoon a Barn Owl floated up and down the eastern sea wall before heading in to the bushes. This combined with a Buzzard and a feeding Kestrel made for a good day for predatory birds.

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There was a Kingfisher reported by the deeps today and I saw one at Southmoor this morning, hovering above the inter-tidal area.

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All in all there are still plenty of waders and wildfowl in Farlington but they’ll soon be going so it’s worth getting down for a last look.