Collaborative Efforts

DSC_0065At the Wildlife Trust we’re firm believers in helping out where we can. After all, conservation is our main function and many species don’t respect site boundaries so helping out on other sites often helps out on our sites in the long term.

With that in mind we have been helping the RSPB out with the Little Tern project in Langstone Harbour. These fantastic little birds live a precarious existence, preferring to nest on bare, fine shingle that is prone to getting washed away in any high spring tides. They are also very vulnerable to predation and being muscled out by the gulls.

The RSPB have been protecting the tern colonies in Langstone for some time now but with an increase in gull nesting numbers, especially an increase in the very impressive Mediterranean Gull, the Common Terns and Little Terns have had a rough few years.  This year it was therefore decided to create a raft to put out on the Oyster Beds, one of the main sites off the west side of Hayling island.

DSC_0074DSC_0080In my mind this was a relatively easy task, tying some barrels on and covering with shingle. In my mind it wasn’t going to be a big raft. Turns out I was mistaken. The four metre square (!!!!) raft arrived in four pieces with 24 barrels to be lashed on and bolted together and shingled. It took a long day but our Thursday team worked extremely hard to get this done, well into extra time. I know Wez (Langstone Reserve Officer for the RSPB) was very grateful for their help.

Eventually it was floated and rowed out to its designated spot just off one of the islands. It was then covered with a tarpaulin to deter the gulls, who nest earlier than the terns. It would then be unveiled at the crucial time to allow the terns on.

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Next we headed out to Baker’s Island, just off the eastern side of Farlington. This is one of the main Little Tern breeding areas and consists of a small spit of shingle, surrounded by salt marsh. The shingle had been put there a few years ago and the northern tip is finer grained, the southern consisting of larger pebbles. We had to firstly weed the entire area, removing any vegetation that would deter the terns from using the site. We then spread out the finer sand to occupy as wide an area as possible. The larger shingle is unsuitable for the terns, therefore small dinner plate sized patches were added to provide suitable opportunities. The old electric fencing was removed and it shall be restrung soon. This is to prevent foxes from decimating the colony which it could do over night. Encouragingly we saw two Little Terns whilst out there so they’re starting to arrive. Little decoys were put out to encourage terns to use the site as it already looks like their mates are there.

DSC_0142DSC_0145DSC_0148I learned a lot this week about the management of seabird colonies and what is involved in their upkeep and success. I also learned a lot about tern ecology which I am very grateful to Wez for. Hopefully with potential on many of our sites for establishing sea bird colonies, I can use this in the future. I know the RSPB were very grateful for the efforts of the Wildlife Trust volunteers for getting this work done, they really did do a sterling effort over some very tough days.

Whilst writing this I got an email off Wez with this link:

After a matter of minutes of removing the tarp from the raft there were Common Terns landing on the raft and showing signs of settling down. A great result.

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