The Ton is Up

I arrived early at Farlington today and had the best bit of the day, not that it was bad later on, but the start of the day was very fine.

Langstone Harbour early morning

Langstone Harbour early morning

Walking out to the east wall there were several bearded tit calling in the reeds near the Building, despite the calm they were not feeding on top of the reeds though, so views were fleeting. The fence along the track had a pair of stonechat and as I arrived on the top of the wall there were brent geese just starting to fly onto the fields to graze. The picture above was taken looking slightly east of south over the tip of North Binness. Looking east over the same island I took the picture below.

North Binness Island

North Binness Island

I returned to the building to meet the arriving volunteers coming for the regular Tuesday work party, we had two new recruits today, as well as a good turn out of regulars. At the Building 2 chiffchaff were found feeding in the bushes around the compound, my first of 2013 and taking me to 99 bird species for the year, then I saw the adult male marsh harrier hunting over the Point Field and the ton was up!

We were doing a range of tasks today, coppicing a few of the willows at the Double Ponds in the Bushes, thistle spudding and dealing with a couple of fallen hawthorns. Meanwhile a second party were working hard to remove the old straining posts in the old fence replaced alongside the reedbed. I had to leave to attend a meeting before lunchtime, so did not actually do much of the work myself. Hopefully things continued well during the afternoon. My meeting was to discuss the future of the outfall sluice front the main lake, or more correctly Shut Lake. This sluice is important as it is regulates the water level along the stream and is the key to managing the salinity levels across much of the site, so what happens to it is of considerable importance.

 

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One thought on “The Ton is Up

  1. Really enjoying these blogs, Rob. Saw my first ever pair of marsh harriers at Stodmarsh in Kent just before Christmas.

    I’m a bit hazy about some of the places you mention on the reserves – is there a detailed map available somewhere?

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